Welcoming your participants – first impressions count!

You know the saying: you can tell in the first 2 minutes if you’re going to get on with someone. Well, I think people make a similar decision at events – are they going to have a great experience, or not? The welcome a participant gets at an event can set the tone for their whole experience.

When someone books a ticket to an event, they get an idea of what to expect from the website/social media coverage and from conversations about past events. They arrive full of excitement and expectation – and as event organisers, we need to meet (or exceed!) their expectations.

This starts with the moment they walk through the front door. First impressions count – so how do you make sure they’re good?

First of all, guide participants through the door. Put up a big sign so they don’t get lost – you know where registration is, but they have no idea. It might be subliminal, but being told where to go and knowing that you’ve got there makes you feel safe and gives you confidence.

As people arrive, do your best to avoid a queue. Try and stagger the arrival time or at least encourage people to arrive early so you don’t get a huge rush 10 minutes before the welcome kicks off. However, if you do have a queue, make sure participants have an idea of how long they’re going to be waiting and let them know exactly what will be required of them at the registration process to speed things up. And give them something to do or look at while they wait – make it part of the experience!

When they get to registration, make sure they are met with a smile. Ensure that the people on registration follow the same dress code as the participants – they shouldn’t be smart if the participants are casual (or vice versa). It sounds simple, but if someone’s dressed in the same way as you, it makes you feel like you’re in the right place.

Sharing information is a vital part of the welcome, too: check that everyone on registration has all the information participants will need. Our golden rule is if someone has to ask a question it’s because we’ve failed to share the information. Participants will need to know some or all of the following:

  • where the toilets are
  • where to get tea/coffee
  • where to find the cloakroom
  • where the opening session is
  • how to log on to the wi-fi
  • where lunch will be held

Of course, if they’ve arrived late they might just want you to take them to the opening talk!

You know the information that you need to share, so share it – and if you do get asked a question on something you’ve missed, write it down on a sticky note and make sure you share that info in future.

Finally – make sure the registration team has time to chat with participants. If someone wants to tell you their journey sucked, or that they are super excited about the day, make time to engage with them – it’s part of providing a great customer experience.

This is a busy, stressful time for the event team – but participants don’t need to know that. What they want to know is that they are welcome and that there are friendly people at the event. It can be pretty stressful for some (most!) people to walk into a full room full of strangers, so if the welcome can relax them even a bit, it makes the whole experience a little easier.

Welcoming your participants – first impressions count! was last modified: August 8th, 2016 by Jacqui Davidson